Sushi Kee's Sushi and Sashimi Catalog

Soybean

Soybeans

 

Soybean – { soya bean, soy pea, soja  and soi} The first written record of soybeans is dated 2838 b.c., the Chinese have been cultivating them for thousands of years. So important are soybeans to the Chinese that they're considered one of the five sacred grains along with rice, wheat, barley and millet. Soybeans didn't find their way to Japan until the 6th century and to Europe until the 17th century. Their nutritive value was not scientifically confirmed until the 20th century. Since the 1920s the United States production has grown to one-third of the world's total production. There are over 1,000 varieties of this LEGUME, in sizes from as small as a pea to as large as a cherry. Soybean pods are covered with a fine tawny to gray fuzz and range in color from tan to black. The beans come in various combinations of red, yellow, green, brown and black. Their flavor is generally quite bland. Unlike other legumes, the soybean is low in carbohydrates and high in protein and desirable oil. Soybeans are used to produce a wide variety of products including TOFU (soybean curd), SOYBEAN OIL, SOY FLOUR, SOY MILK, SOY SAUCE, MISO and TAMARI. They can be sprouted and used in salads or as a cooked (steamed) vegetable. Fresh soybeans are available in late summer and early fall. Dried soybeans, beans for sprouting and a huge variety of soybean products are available.


Rolls

California Roll

California Roll

Master Chef Kee makes his California rolls in the classic method of an “inside-out roll”. With the Rice on the outside of the Nori and a sprinkling of sesame seeds. On the inside is a long slice of fresh avocado, cucumber strips and surimi (imitation crab). Most Californians eat these rolls dipped in there own mixture of Wasabi and soy sauce.

Surimi - [soo-REE-mee]
Meaning "formed fish" and referring to fish pulp that's formed into various shapes. Surimi and the similar KAMABOKO have been made for centuries by the Japanese and are thought to date as far back as 1100 a.d. Most surimi found in North America is made from Alaska POLLOCK, a fish with a lean, firm flesh that has a delicate, slightly sweet flavor. Pacific WHITING is also beginning to be used for surimi but its flesh is so soft that it requires the addition of egg whites and potatoes to be firm enough for processing. Surimi (which is sometimes simply labeled "imitation crabmeat," "imitation lobster," etc.) is best when used as an ingredient in salads, casseroles and soups.


Kee’s Roll

Kee's Roll

Kee’s roll is like no other roll. Spicy tuna and salmon topped with fresh tuna and salmon. Not just a garnish, the slices of supreme lemon add a nice surprise to this culinary treat. Garnished with green onions and smelt roe.

Roe - [ROH]
This delicacy falls into two categories — hard roe and soft roe. Hard roe is female fish eggs, while soft roe (also called white roe ) is the milt of male fish. The eggs of some CRUSTACEANS (such as lobster) are referred to as CORAL. Roe can range in size from 1 to 2 ounces to over 3 pounds. If the fish is small, the roe is cooked inside the whole fish. The roe of medium and large fish is usually removed and cooked separately. Most fish roe is edible but others (including that of the great barracuda and some members of the puffer and trunkfish families) are toxic. The choicest roe comes from carp, herring, mackerel and shad, but those from cod, flounder, haddock, lumpfish, mullet, perch, pike, salmon, sturgeon and whitefish also have their fans. Salting roe transforms it into CAVIAR. Roe is marketed fresh, frozen and canned. Fresh roe is available in the spring. It should have a clean smell and look moist and firm. The extremely fragile membrane that holds the eggs or milt must be gently washed before preparation. Roe can be sautéed, poached or, providing it's medium-size or larger, broiled. It can also be used in sauces.


Nigiri Sushi

Scallops

Scallops
Sea Scallops – Served Nepoleon style layered with Cucumber and Lemon. Topped with Flying fish roe and a Lemon juice and olive oil sauce with a touch of sea salt.


Sashimi

Kee’s Daily Choice Sashimi (Snapper - Usuzukuri)

Snapper

Snapper {Usuzukuri}– Kee will prepare for you his own wonderful interpretation of this white fish. Served with Lemon, Green Onions, Sea Salt and a Lemon and Olive Oil sauce.

Usuzukuri - Ultra thin

 


Seared Ahi Tuna

Seared Tuna

Seared Ahi Tuna

 

Served on cucumber with a portion of daikon, green onions and a sprinkling of sesame seeds.

Ahi - [AH-hee]
The Hawaiian name for yellowfin, as well as bigeye TUNA. From 100 to 250 pounds.

 


Tuna Tartar

Tuna Tartar

Tuna Tartare – Daily fresh tuna served classicly with a quail egg and Kee’s special tartar seasoning. Olive oil, Lemon juice, Fresh Wasabi, Sesame Seeds and Sea Salt with a garnish of daikon.

Tartare -[tar-TAR]
A dish of coarsely ground or finely chopped high-quality, raw lean meat or fish that has been seasoned with salt, pepper and herbs. It's thought to have originated in the Baltic provinces of Russia where, in medieval times, the Tartars shredded red meat with a knife and ate it raw. Today the seasoned raw meat is usually shaped into a mound with an indentation in the top, into which is placed a raw egg yolk. Beef tartare (also referred to as steak tartare ) is usually served with capers, chopped parsley and onions.


Entrées

 

Grilled Yellowtail

Grilled Yellow Tail

 

 

 

 


Yellowtail Collar

Yellow Tail Collar

Yelowtail collar – Kee will prepare this unique cut of yellowtail perfectly. Accented with green onions and a mild sweet soy sauce.

 


Shrimp tempura

Shrimp Tempura

Tempura -[tehm-POOR-uh, TEHM-poor-uh]
A Japanese specialty of batter-dipped, deep-fried pieces of fish or vegetables. Tempura, which is usually accompanied by soy sauce, can be served as an HORS D'OEUVRE, first course or entrée.


Shrimp Shumai

Shrimp

Shrimp Shumai {Pot Stickers} – Kee steams these delicate shumai or dumplings stuffed with shrimp.

 

 

Pot Stickers - Small dumplings made of WON TON SKINS filled with ground meat or shellfish and other savory items, scallions and seasonings. The pot stickers can be browned on one side or steamed, then turned and simmered in broth. Pot stickers are usually served as appetizers, accompanied with various dipping sauces.


Salads

Squid Salad

Squid Salad

Squid Salad [Ika sansai] – O.K. it may not have iceberg lettuce in it, but Kee knows you’ve had Tuna Salad. Sorry, not even close! Kee’s Squid Salad starts with perfectly cooked (steamed) squid cooled in a gastrique of sugar and vinegar with sesame oil, Japanese vegetables, sesame seeds and soy sauce.

Squid - [SKWIHD]
As a ten-armed member of the CEPHALOPOD class in the MOLLUSK family, squid is related to both the OCTOPUS and CUTTLEFISH. Squid meat has a firm, chewy texture and mild, somewhat sweet flavor. Also called calamari, squid can range in size from 1 inch to the seldom seen 80-foot behemoth of the deep. Smaller squid are marketed in fresh, frozen, canned, sun-dried and pickled forms. They are very popular in Asian and Mediterranean cuisines. When buying fresh squid choose those that are small and whole with clear eyes and an ocean-fresh fragrance. Squid can be pan-fried, baked, boiled, stir-fried or coated with batter and deep-fried. The cooking time should always be short, since the texture of squid becomes rubbery when overcooked. Squid is used raw by the Japanese in SUSHI dishes. The ink can be extracted from the ink sacs and used to color preparations like PASTA or to flavor dishes such as calamares en su tinta  ("squid in their ink"), a Spanish dish. Squid are rich in protein and phosphorus.


Octopus Salad

Octopus Salad

Octopus Salad [Ajitzuke Tako] – This will soon be your favorite salad, Bar None! Octopus in a gastrique of sugar and vinegar with sesame oil, sesame seeds and soy sauce.

Octopus - [OK-tuh-puhs]
Member of the CEPHALOPOD class in the MOLLUSK family, the octopus is related to the SQUID and CUTTLEFISH. Rarely 50-foot, the majority reach only 1 to 2 feet (tentacles extended) and weigh about 3 pounds. Also called devilfish  — this monster of the deep survives on a rich diet of clams and scallops giving it a highly flavorful meat that, though rubbery, is extremely popular in Japan and the Mediterranean countries. Predressed fresh and frozen octopus is available in many supermarkets and specialty fish markets. As with most species, those that are younger and smaller are more tender. The 8 tentacles and the body are edible, but the eyes, mouth area and viscera are discarded. The ink sac contains a black liquid that can be used to color and flavor foods such as pasta, soups and stews. Smoked and canned octopus are also available. Octopus can be eaten in a variety of ways including raw, boiled and pickled, sautéed, deep-fried or for more mature specimens, simmered or boiled for several hours.


Seaweed Salad

Seaweed Salad

Juka Salad [Hiyash wakamei] - Simply executed this salad is a perfect way to start your culinary trip to Kee’s platter of favorites. Seaweed in a gastrique of sugar and vinegar with sesame oil, sesame seeds and soy sauce.

 


Soups

Ochazuke

Salman Soup

Master Chef Kee makes no ordinary Ochazuke. Perfectly cooked salmon sits atop the rice appearing to float in the Nagatani en (green tea and seaweed soup). Always served the classic method with a little Wasabi on the edge of the bowl allowing you to adjust the spiciness as you like. Now you know Japanese comfort food, Kee style!

 

Ochazuke or Chazuke is a sort of snack for the Japanese people.  It is a utilization of leftovers and is quite often served when a husband comes home late at night from a drinking binge in his favorite watering hole.  Ingredients may be some pickles, grilled salty salmon flakes and some Nori seaweed.  These are eaten with 'left-over rice soaked in hot, green tea. It can be prepared very quickly to satisfy a hungry and drunken husband.


Fish

Tuna – Bluefin

 

Blue Fin Tuna

One of the largest tunas is the bluefin, which can weigh over 1,000 pounds. Young bluefins have a lighter flesh and are not as strongly flavored. As bluefins grows to adulthood, their flesh turns dark red and their flavor becomes more pronounced.


Calamari

Calamari
Master Chef Kee does like onion rings but you won’t find any in his kitchen, not when Calamari is available. Kee will cook these to perfect tenderness (Not an easy thing to do with squid).

Calamari - [kal-uh-MAHR-ee] or Squid - [SKWIHD]

A ten-armed member of the CEPHALOPOD class in the MOLLUSK family, squid is related to both the OCTOPUS and CUTTLEFISH. Squid meat has a firm, chewy texture and mild, somewhat sweet flavor. Also called calamari, squid can range in size from 1 inch to the seldom seen 80-foot behemoth of the deep. Smaller squid are marketed in fresh, frozen, canned, sun-dried and pickled forms. They are very popular in Asian and Mediterranean cuisines. When buying fresh squid choose those that are small and whole with clear eyes and an ocean-fresh fragrance. Squid can be pan-fried, baked, boiled, stir-fried or coated with batter and deep-fried. The cooking time should always be short, since the texture of squid becomes rubbery when overcooked. Squid is used raw by the Japanese in SUSHI dishes. The ink can be extracted from the ink sacs and used to color preparations like PASTA or to flavor dishes such as calamares en su tinta  ("squid in their ink"), a Spanish dish. Squid are rich in protein and phosphorus.